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This help section is for troubleshooting and for problem solving.
 
Viewing Adobe PDF documents in a web browser

Viewing PDF documents on the desktop or in a browser
You can open PDF documents in two different ways. One way is to open the PDF documents directly in the Adobe Reader application on your desktop. Another way is to open a PDF document that is posted on the Internet in your web browser. When you open a PDF document in your web browser, Adobe Reader tools appear within the web browser. You can change preference settings to determine whether PDF documents on the web are opened in Adobe Reader on your desktop or in a web browser. (See Viewing Adobe PDF documents in a web browser.)

To determine whether web-based PDF documents are opened within a browser:
  1. Choose Edit > Preferences (Windows) or Adobe Reader > Preferences (Mac OS), and then click Internet.

  2. Select Display PDF In Browser to open PDF documents on the web within the browser. Deselect this option if you want web-based PDF documents to open in Adobe Reader, not the browser.
Viewing Adobe PDF documents in a web browser
Adobe Reader makes viewing Adobe PDF documents on the web easy. You can view PDF documents in your browser, or you can set up Adobe Reader to work separately as a helper application so that when you open or download PDF documents from the web they open in a separate Adobe Reader window. If you set your preferences to start Adobe Reader as a separate application outside your browser and automatically open linked PDF documents in Adobe Reader, you cannot use Fast Web Viewing, form submittal in a browser, or search highlighting on the web.

To use Adobe Reader as a helper application:
  1. Choose Edit > Preference (Windows) or Adobe Reader > Preferences (Mac OS), and select Internet.

  2. Deselect Display PDF In Browser, and click OK.
To set browser and Internet preferences:
Choose Edit > Preferences (Windows) or Adobe Reader > Preferences (Mac OS), and select Internet in the left pane. Set the following options, and then click OK.

Display PDF In Browser
Displays any PDF document opened from the web inside the browser window. If this option is not selected, PDF documents open in a separate Adobe Reader window.

Allow Fast Web View
Downloads PDF documents for viewing on the web one page at a time. If this option is not selected, the entire PDF file downloads before it appears. If you want the entire PDF document to continue downloading in the background while you view the first page of requested information, also select Allow Speculative Downloading In The Background.

Allow Speculative Downloading In The Background
Allows a PDF document to continue downloading from the web, even after the first requested page appears. Downloading in the background stops when any other task, such as paging through the document, is initiated in Adobe Reader.

Connection Speed
Choose a connection speed from the menu. This setting is also used by the multimedia plug-in.

Internet Settings
Click to set up your Internet connection. Follow the prompts, or consult your ISP provider if you need help.

Related Subtopics:
Viewing in a browser in Windows
Viewing in a browser in Mac OS
Viewing in a browser in Windows
You can view the PDF document in the web browser if you are using Internet Explorer 5.5 or later, Netscape Navigator 7.1 or later, or America Online 9.0 or later. Because keyboard commands may be mapped to the web browser, some Adobe Reader shortcuts may not be available. Similarly, you may need to use the tools and commands in the Adobe Reader toolbar rather than the browser toolbar or menu bar. For example, to print a PDF document, you need to use the Print button in the Adobe Reader toolbar rather than choosing File > Print in the browser. (In Internet Explorer, you can choose File > Print, Edit > Copy, and Edit > Find on the Internet Explorer toolbar.)

Viewing in a browser in Mac OS
Adobe Reader works automatically with Safari version 1.2.3 or later and Mac OS 10.3 or later to make viewing Adobe PDF documents on the web easy. The first time you open Adobe Reader, your system automatically is configured to use Adobe Reader to open PDF files in your browser. Adobe Reader does not add any tools or menus to the Safari toolbar and menu bar.

Note: Be sure that Safari is not running the first time you start Adobe Reader.
When you view PDF documents in your browser, some keyboard commands may not be available because they are mapped to the web browser. Similarly, you may need to use the tools and commands in the Adobe Reader toolbar rather than the browser toolbar or menu bar. For example, to print a PDF document, you need to use the Print button in the Adobe Reader toolbar rather than the Print command in the browser.
About Adobe PDF forms
An Adobe PDF form is an electronic-based document that can collect data from a user and then send that data via email or the web. A PDF form can contain static or interactive form fields; interactive form fields let the user fill in the form using their computer, while static form fields must be printed and filled in by hand. Users who fill in a PDF form that contains interactive form fields using Adobe Acrobat Professional or Adobe Acrobat Standard can save their form data along with the PDF form; Adobe Reader users can save only a blank copy of the PDF form, unless the form author added special usage rights.

It’s easy to create electronic PDF forms using Adobe Designer or Adobe Acrobat Professional. You can design and create an entirely new form, or you can quickly convert your existing paper and electronic forms to PDF and then add PDF form fields.

There are three types of Adobe PDF forms:

  1. Fill-and-print PDF forms are typically digital presentations of paper forms. Fill-and-print forms may contain interactive form fields or static form fields; either way, the user must manually deliver the form, such as via postal mail or fax machine.
  2. Submit-by-email PDF forms contain a button that either extracts the form data from the PDF form and attaches that data to an email message or attaches the complete PDF document.
  3. Submit on-line PDF forms contain a button that sends the form data to an on-line repository, such as a database.

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